Welcome to Me and My Child

Welcome to Me and My Child where you’ll find lots of information on the wonderful journey of parenthood, from pregnancy, to birth and your child’s early development. Every child’s development is different, so be sure to consult with your health care professional if you have any concerns.

You’ll also find plenty of information about what you can feed your child.

When it comes to babies, Breastfeeding is best, and provides the ideal balanced diet and protection against illness. During pregnancy and after delivery, a mother’s diet should contain sufficient key nutrients. Professional guidance can be sought on diet and the preparation for and maintenance of breastfeeding. Infant formula is intended to replace breast-milk when mothers do not breastfeed. A decision not to breast-feed, or to introduce partial bottle-feeding, could reduce the supply of breast-milk. Once reduced, it is difficult to re-establish. Infant formula should be prepared and used as directed. Unnecessary or improper use, such as the use of unboiled water, unboiled bottles or incorrect dilution may present a health hazard. Social and financial implications, such as the preparation requirements and the cost of providing formula until 12 months of age, should be considered when choosing how to feed infants.

This website mentions food, toddler milks and sometimes infant formula.

By clicking on the "I understand" link below, you confirm your understanding that Nestlé is supplying this information about formulas for informational or educational purposes.

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Stage3

Stage 3 – Around 8-10 months

 

Consistency: Lumpy, textural foods promoting chewing and soft finger food

Introduce a range of temperatures: cold, room temperature and warm (note never give babies hot food and always test the temperature yourself before giving it to baby).

Amount: Up to 1 cup at meals and ½ cup snacks

Breastfeeds: 3 per day
Timing: Before or between breastfeeds

Frequency: 3 times a day plus 1 snack
Note – Always seek individualised advice when you have a family history of allergy, intolerance, coeliac disease or your baby is suspected to have feeding delays (such as tongue tie or physical or mental disabilities).

Type of foods: Increase variety of foods, add legumes, variety of grains and cereals, fruits such as berries and citrus fruits, and stronger flavoured vegetables such as onion, and harder to eat vegetables such as sweet corn, shredded salad greens, spinach, tomato. Introduce eggs, and ground nuts & seeds, as well as cooked milk products in small amounts.

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Recipes



Creamed Corn and Chicken Soup
Shepherds Pie